GIFT OF MAGI PDF

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The Gift of the Magi. ONE DOLLAR AND EIGHTY-SEVEN CENTS. That was all. She had put it aside, one cent and then another and then another, in her careful. One dollar and eighty–seven cents. That was all. And sixty cents of it was in pennies. Pennies saved one and two at a time by bulldozing the grocer and the. The Gift of the Magi Story Pyramid: Most good stories start with a fundamental list of ingredients: the initial situation, conflict, complication, climax, suspense.


Gift Of Magi Pdf

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Download The Gift of the Magi free in PDF & EPUB format. Download O. Henry's The Gift of the Magi for your site, tablet, IPAD, PC or mobile. THE GIFT OF THE MAGI. by O. Henry. One dollar and eighty-seven cents. That was all. And sixty cents of it was in pennies. Pennies saved one and two at a time . from The Gift of the Magi and Other Stories. This Level 1 ELLSA lesson can be accessed on the internet at biosworisbeca.ga Lesson .

Which is all very good. Della finished her cry and attended to her cheeks with the powder rag. She stood by the window and looked out dully at a gray cat walking a gray fence in a gray backyard. She had been saving every penny she could for months, with this result. Twenty dollars a week doesn't go far. Expenses had been greater than she had calculated. They always are. Her Jim. Many a happy hour she had spent planning for something nice for him. Something fine and rare and sterling--something just a little bit near to being worthy of the honor of being owned by Jim.

There was a pier-glass between the windows of the room. A very thin and very agile person may, by observing his reflection in a rapid sequence of longitudinal strips, obtain a fairly accurate conception of his looks. Della, being slender, had mastered the art. Suddenly she whirled from the window and stood before the glass. Rapidly she pulled down her hair and let it fall to its full length. Now, there were two possessions of the James Dillingham Youngs in which they both took a mighty pride.

One was Jim's gold watch that had been his father's and his grandfather's. The other was Della's hair. Had the queen of Sheba lived in the flat across the airshaft, Della would have let her hair hang out the window some day to dry just to depreciate Her Majesty's jewels and gifts.

Had King Solomon been the janitor, with all his treasures piled up in the basement, Jim would have pulled out his watch every time he passed, just to see him pluck at his beard from envy.

So now Della's beautiful hair fell about her rippling and shining like a cascade of brown waters. It reached below her knee and made itself almost a garment for her. And then she did it up again nervously and quickly. Once she faltered for a minute and stood still while a tear or two splashed on the worn red carpet. On went her old brown jacket; on went her old brown hat. With a whirl of skirts and with the brilliant sparkle still in her eyes, she fluttered out the door and down the stairs to the street.

Where she stopped the sign read: "Mne. Hair Goods of All Kinds. Madame, large, too white, chilly, hardly looked the "Sofronie. Oh, and the next two hours tripped by on rosy wings. Forget the hashed metaphor. She was ransacking the stores for Jim's present. She found it at last. It surely had been made for Jim and no one else. There was no other like it in any of the stores, and she had turned all of them inside out. It was a platinum fob chain simple and chaste in design, properly proclaiming its value by substance alone and not by meretricious ornamentation--as all good things should do.

It was even worthy of The Watch. As soon as she saw it she knew that it must be Jim's. It was like him. Quietness and value--the description applied to both. Twenty-one dollars they took from her for it, and she hurried home with the 87 cents. With that chain on his watch Jim might be properly anxious about the time in any company. Grand as the watch was, he sometimes looked at it on the sly on account of the old leather strap that he used in place of a chain. When Della reached home her intoxication gave way a little to prudence and reason.

She got out her curling irons and lighted the gas and went to work repairing the ravages made by generosity added to love. Which is always a tremendous task, dear friends--a mammoth task. Within forty minutes her head was covered with tiny, close-lying curls that made her look wonderfully like a truant schoolboy.

The Gift of the Magi – Free PDF Download

She looked at her reflection in the mirror long, carefully, and critically. But what could I do--oh! Jim was never late. Della doubled the fob chain in her hand and sat on the corner of the table near the door that he always entered. Then she heard his step on the stair away down on the first flight, and she turned white for just a moment. She had a habit of saying a little silent prayer about the simplest everyday things, and now she whispered: "Please God, make him think I am still pretty.

He looked thin and very serious. Poor fellow, he was only twenty-two--and to be burdened with a family! He needed a new overcoat and he was without gloves. Jim stopped inside the door, as immovable as a setter at the scent of quail.

His eyes were fixed upon Della, and there was an expression in them that she could not read, and it terrified her. It was not anger, nor surprise, nor disapproval, nor horror, nor any of the sentiments that she had been prepared for.

He simply stared at her fixedly with that peculiar expression on his face. Della wriggled off the table and went for him. I had my hair cut off and sold because I couldn't have lived through Christmas without giving you a present. It'll grow out again--you won't mind, will you? I just had to do it. My hair grows awfully fast. You don't know what a nice--what a beautiful, nice gift I've got for you. I'm me without my hair, ain't I? Now, there were two possessions of the James Dillingham Youngs in which they both took a mighty pride.

One was Jim's gold watch that had been his father's and his grandfather's. The other was Della's hair. Had the queen of Sheba lived in the flat across the airshaft, Della would have let her hair hang out the window some day to dry just to depreciate Her Majesty's jewels and gifts. Had King Solomon been the janitor, with all his treasures piled up in the basement, Jim would have pulled out his watch every time he passed, just to see him pluck at his beard from envy.

So now Della's beautiful hair fell about her rippling and shining like a cascade of brown waters. It reached below her knee and made itself almost a garment for her. And then she did it up again nervously and quickly.

The Gift of the Magi

Once she faltered for a minute and stood still while a tear or two splashed on the worn red carpet. On went her old brown jacket; on went her old brown hat.

With a whirl of skirts and with the brilliant sparkle still in her eyes, she fluttered out the door and down the stairs to the street. Where she stopped the sign read: "Mne. Hair Goods of All Kinds. Madame, large, too white, chilly, hardly looked the "Sofronie. Oh, and the next two hours tripped by on rosy wings. Forget the hashed metaphor. She was ransacking the stores for Jim's present. She found it at last. It surely had been made for Jim and no one else.

There was no other like it in any of the stores, and she had turned all of them inside out. It was a platinum fob chain simple and chaste in design, properly proclaiming its value by substance alone and not by meretricious ornamentation--as all good things should do.

It was even worthy of The Watch. As soon as she saw it she knew that it must be Jim's. It was like him. Quietness and value--the description applied to both. Twenty-one dollars they took from her for it, and she hurried home with the 87 cents. With that chain on his watch Jim might be properly anxious about the time in any company.

Grand as the watch was, he sometimes looked at it on the sly on account of the old leather strap that he used in place of a chain. When Della reached home her intoxication gave way a little to prudence and reason. She got out her curling irons and lighted the gas and went to work repairing the ravages made by generosity added to love.

Which is always a tremendous task, dear friends--a mammoth task. Within forty minutes her head was covered with tiny, close-lying curls that made her look wonderfully like a truant schoolboy. She looked at her reflection in the mirror long, carefully, and critically. But what could I do--oh!

Jim was never late. Della doubled the fob chain in her hand and sat on the corner of the table near the door that he always entered.

Then she heard his step on the stair away down on the first flight, and she turned white for just a moment. She had a habit for saying little silent prayer about the simplest everyday things, and now she whispered: "Please God, make him think I am still pretty. He looked thin and very serious. Poor fellow, he was only twenty-two--and to be burdened with a family! He needed a new overcoat and he was without gloves. Jim stopped inside the door, as immovable as a setter at the scent of quail.

His eyes were fixed upon Della, and there was an expression in them that she could not read, and it terrified her. It was not anger, nor surprise, nor disapproval, nor horror, nor any of the sentiments that she had been prepared for.

He simply stared at her fixedly with that peculiar expression on his face. Della wriggled off the table and went for him.

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I had my hair cut off and sold because I couldn't have lived through Christmas without giving you a present. When Della opens Jim's present to find the combs, we understand why Jim was so shocked. It also becomes clear now that he's not angry with Della, and he assures her he'll love her no matter how she looks.

Although the climax doesn't fully "predict" the ending, it is the first half of the twist. And if we do get to thinking about where Jim got the money to download those combs, we might be able to guess what happens next. Suspense: Della's Turn We're still waiting to know how Jim will react to Della's gift, and we might also be wondering just how he got the money to download those expensive combs.

Della gives Jim the watch chain, and… Denouement: So…how about those chops? Presented with his gift, Jim calmly reveals with a smile that he sold his watch to download Della her combs. So her present is useless too. Well, that does it for the Christmas presents. Not much left to do but eat those pork chops.

Conclusion: Pretty fly for magi. In the narrator's final paragraph, which is definitely a "zoom out" of epic proportions, the narrator tells us that it doesn't really matter that Jim and Della's presents turned out to be useless.

O. Henry's "The Gift of the Magi"

They are the wisest givers of all — in fact, they're the magi. We leave feeling satisfied and happy. His penchant for dramatic irony, a trademark in many of his short stories, gives his style its distinctive flavour. Della and Jim are not the products of an overly sentimental imagination.

The author strives to create circumstances as well as physical surroundings that ring true to life. Both the protagonists accept life as they find it without giving in to the negative emotions of hopelessness or despair. His certainty that they will both use these items in the future provides the unspoken thought that life is bound to improve for them.

The protagonists do not react to each other out of saintliness, duty, or love of self- imposed sacrifice: They simply embody the twin spirits of love and Christmas. For the less-than-devout O. Henry, these essences are one and the same. The author suggests that sentiment does not have to be sacrificed to the cause of realism. Crowded city in which the Youngs rent for eight dollars per month a second-story flat.

It is furnished, but with obviously second-hand and outdated furniture. Henry skilfully evokes the shabbiness of the rented rooms and the building that contains them, calling attention to such details as the non-functional mail slot in the lobby and the broken doorbell.

Within the flat itself, he points out the worn carpet and couch and the almost useless piece of mirror that Della has for making herself up. It is essential that the narrator explain the poor circumstances in which the loving couple do live. The lack of any elegance or pride in their immediate surroundings must be emphasized so readers understand why it is so vital that each character present the other with a wonderful Christmas gift. Surroundings so dismal make both Jim and Della yearn for any possession of substantial beauty and worth as a gift.

What is one Biblical allusion quote from the story? Why are Della and Jim connected to the three wise men from the Bible? The story alludes to the Bible most prominently in the final paragraph: They were the first to give Christmas gifts. Being wise, their gifts were doubtless wise ones.

And here I have told you the story of two children who were not wise. The narrator is alluding to the Wise Men the Magi of the Bible, who brought gifts to the new-born Jesus because, seeing the Star of Bethlehem, they perceived that it heralded the birth of the King of the Jews.

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There are several important meanings to this allusion. First, the Wise Men were not Jews themselves; the word magi was historically a term for followers of Zoroastrianism. Some accounts even consider them priests, or kings. The importance of this fact lies in the meaning of their visit to the infant Jesus; not necessarily as a sign of abandoning their own religion, but as a gesture of deep respect across lines of faith and nobility.

Second, the allusion implies that, being the first people to give Christmas gifts, the thought and purpose behind those gifts are at least as important as the gifts themselves. The reason and the way in which the magi gave their gifts is the true meaning, not the exact identity or the monetary value of the gift.

Della and Jim are unwise "children" because, in a sense, their actions were hasty, emotional and narrowly conceived; their sole intent was to please the other. The irony is, of course, that neither of them is able to enjoy their gift now, and they have both lost what was most valuable to them.

To the modern, materialistic perspective, this might seem like a foolish arrangement. Yet, "they are the magi" because the purpose of their actions was pure, and indeed they did make each other happy by way of showing the lengths of self-sacrifice they were each willing to go to in order to exalt the other.

As frustrated as they both might be, it seems difficult to imagine Jim and Della doing anything but growing closer after the events of this Christmas. How does point of view including the narrator and his language help to explain the irony and the related theme in "The Gift of the Magi" by O.

Henry's "The Gift of the Magi," the theme of the story is that of selfless giving from the heart, like that of the magi or wise men in the Christmas story. The irony, of course, is that Della sells her hair to download Jim a watch fob "fob chain" for his pocket watch, but Jim sells his watch to download Della beautiful combs for her long, luxurious hair.

In this case, each has sacrificed what was most dear to him or her for the other—which the other then cannot use.

The Gift of the Magi

Does not assume character's perspective and is not a character in the story. The narrator reports on events and lets the reader supply the meaning.

However, it is also noted that this storyteller is somewhat unusual—he is a narrator with personality and presence. The narrator while not a character is the story , adopts a personality that connects to the reader The narrator's style is informal: described by one source as "folksy"— to me he talks like a fairy tale.

However, he also adds side comments throughout the story. This was done by Charles Dickens as well, and is called "authorial intrusion," which gives the story an added dimension. The narrator is like a third character, but only in the telling; and he concentrates more on Della's feelings. Della's character is presented very much like a princess in need of a hero, as she sits down and cries When Della goes to sell her hair, the narrator makes one think of a Disney princess with his description: With a whirl of skirts and with a brilliant sparkle still in her eyes, she fluttered out the door and down the stairs to the street.

The imagery used supports this feeling: Oh, and the next two hours tripped by on rosy wings. With the mood that the language creates, the reader is probably not surprised by the story's outcome: for before the reader's eyes, a Christmas miracle takes place. Each of the young people gives up that which is dearest to him or her, as a gift from the heart.

The irony is not lost on the audience, especially when the narrator likens the couple to the magi. Like them, the narrator notes: And here I have lamely related to you the uneventful chronicle of two foolish children in a flat who most unwisely sacrificed for each other the greatest treasures of their house. But in a last word to the wise of these days let it be said that of all who give gifts these two were of the wisest. Of all who give and receive gifts, such as they are the wisest.

Everywhere they are the wisest. They are the magi. The narrator belittles his technique first by claiming his account is "lame," and then he resorts to some sarcasm, citing that they "unwisely" sacrificed; however, in the last several sentences, he points out the irony, and says that they gave most wisely: they are the magi—the wise ones.

This, then, points to the story's themes of love and generosity: It is more blessed to give than to receive. The main irony of the story is that both have given away their precious possession to please each other but they both lose their treasures to know that they are the magi.We can't move. If you received this etext on a physical medium such as a disk , you must return it with your request. James Dillingham Young, already introduced to you as Della.

Today I have a lot of fields and a lot of sheep because Mrs. Once she faltered for a minute and stood still while a tear or two splashed on the worn red carpet. Although she lives in an eight-dollar-a- week flat and her general surroundings, even by the greatest stretch of the imagination, do not meet the standards of genteel poverty, Della determines that she cannot live through Christmas without giving Jim a tangible reminder of the season.

Eight dollars a week or a million a year--what is the difference? Skip to main content. The apartment is small.

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